UNDATED (AP) — Organizers have canceled the Boston Marathon for the first time in its 124-year history due to social distancing requirements of the coronavirus outbreak.

The race had endured through two World Wars, a volcanic eruption and a previous pandemic. The race draws a field of 30,000 and already had been postponed from April 20 to Sept. 14. It will be replaced by a virtual event in which participants who verify that they ran 26.2 miles on their own will receive their finisher’s medal.

The Boston Marathon began in 1897 and has been the longest-running annual marathon in the world.

In other news related to the coronavirus pandemic:

— NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is hopeful that coaches will be able to return to their team facilities by next week. Goodell also said during today’s owners conference call that the virtual offseason is being extended for two more weeks. NFL executive vice president of communications, public affairs and policy Jeff Miller said the league’s first consideration is of course the health and safety of the public and the players and the employees and the people who will be participating.

— Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam says racing will be allowed to resume in the state without spectators. The governor says NASCAR will race at Martinsville Speedway on June 10, and that other forms of auto racing and horse racing also are cleared to resume. NASCAR was originally scheduled to make its first of two stops at Martinsville in early May, but the event was postponed because of the outbreak.

— The John Deere Classic is canceling what would have been its 50th straight anniversary as a PGA Tour event. Tournament director Clair Peterson says there were too many hurdles to overcome from the pandemic. The John Deere would have been the fifth PGA Tour event on the revised schedule. The tour had said the first month would be played without fans, leaving it possible for the Deere to have them.

— Sports agent Scott Boras is recommending that his clients refuse Major League Baseball’s attempt to cut salaries during negotiations with the players’ association. He is claiming that team financial issues caused by the coronavirus pandemic have their origin in management debt financing. Boras wrote in an email obtained by The Associated Press that players should not alter terms of the March 26 agreement between MLB and the union that called for players to reduce their salaries to a prorated rate based on a shortened season. MLB on Tuesday proposed a series of tiered reductions that would cause top stars to receive the biggest cuts.

— At least 10 major league franchises have informed minor leaguers they’ll continue to provide allowances after the May 31 expiration of Major League Baseball’s policy guaranteeing those players $400 per week. The San Diego Padres, Miami Marlins and Seattle Mariners are promising payments through August. The Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Mets, Chicago White Sox, Tampa Bay Rays, Texas Rangers and Baltimore Orioles have pledged to do so through at least June. The White Sox are even providing those stipends to 25 minor league players recently released.

— Live horse racing is slated to resume in Maryland this weekend with a three-day session at Laurel Park, which will remain closed to the general public. The Maryland Jockey Club says it has received approval from the Maryland Racing Commission to launch its Summer 2020 meet with live racing on Saturday, but fans are forbidden from entering the track until clearance is received from the state. All races on Saturday, Sunday and Monday will be streamed live on the Laurel Park website.

— Texas will soon allow outdoor pro sports events to have spectators, but their numbers will be strictly limited. Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has revised a decision to let pro sports leagues host events without fans starting in June as part of the states’ move to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic. Abbott’s new order allows outdoor stadiums to host fans up to 25 percent of their normal capacity. Leagues will have to apply to state health officials to be allowed to have fans. Indoor events will still be without spectators.

— Major League Soccer gave its teams the go-ahead to begin small voluntary group training sessions outdoors, the next step in the league’s effort to return to action. The group sessions must comply with local public health and government restrictions. Teams must submit club-specific plans to the league for the sessions. A maximum of six players may be assigned to a single group. All other health and safety measures required when MLS teams began individual training must still be maintained. A league-wide moratorium on full team training remains in effect through next Monday.

— The English Premier League plans to restart on June 17 after a 100-day shutdown with new staggered kickoffs to maximize broadcast slots as fans are prevented from attending games. The clubs agreed Thursday that the competition should resume with a Wednesday night doubleheader featuring Manchester City playing Arsenal and Aston Villa hosting Sheffield United. After those makeup games are played, the 30th round will start on Friday, June 19 provided authorities approve safety plans.

— Three players from English soccer clubs Blackburn and Fulham have tested positive for the coronavirus. Blackburn says captain Elliott Bennett was found to be infected with COVID-19 after testing negative last Friday. Bennett says he doesn’t “feel unwell” and doesn’t have any symptoms. Fulham says two players tested positive but did not name them

— Italy’s top soccer league will resume on June 20. Italy’s sports minister gave Serie A the green light to resume after a meeting with Italian soccer authorities on Thursday. A medical protocol for matches was approved by a technical scientific committee earlier.

— The Hungarian soccer federation says matches in the country can once again be held with spectators in the stadiums. The announcement comes on the back of a government decree allowing the option. Organizers are obliged to keep three seats empty between each occupied seat and no fan may sit directly behind or in front of another.

— Elite sports made a comeback in Australia for the first time since March 22 as the Parramatta Eels beat the Brisbane Broncos 34-6 in the National Rugby League Thursday. No fans were allowed into the 52,500-seat stadium in Brisbane because of strict social distancing rules but the game was broadcast across Australia.

— The European Tour is planning to resume its season close to home. The tour says it has targeted the British Masters in England on July 22 as the restart. That would be followed by five new tournaments in England and Wales that will be called the “U.K. Swing.” The new events will have a prize fund of 1 million euros. European Tour chief Keith Pelley says the plans depend on the U.K. lifting quarantine restrictions, but he’s confident that will happen.

— The Dutch Grand Prix has become the fourth Formula One race canceled this season because of the pandemic. Organizers of the first Dutch GP since 1985 chose not to host it without spectators. F1 wants to start the season in July with no spectators at races.

— Fans will be allowed in the stadiums when the Russian soccer league restarts next month. Spectators will be allowed to attend matches if they don’t exceed 10% of the stadium’s capacity. The Russian league previously announced it would resume games on June 21. There’s no word on what regulations would apply to the fans allowed into Russian stadiums or how the limited number of tickets would be allocated.